Design Skills - Resources and Training for Designers

Mood and Sample Boards

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Mood boards and sample boards are used in conjunction with 2D, 3D drawings and models to further communicate the design intent. Although mood boards are used at the earlier stage of a project to indicate the emotional and contextual aspects of a design concept, sample boards provide the opportunity to study real samples of materials before any final decision is made.

| Mood boards | Sample board | Layout |

Mood boards

Designers use mood or concept boards to convey the overall feel of a project, putting together images and objects which inspire, target desires and faciliate creativity and innovation. Mood boards are also very useful at the early stages of a project as a guide tool to show to clients for approval before proceeding further.

Below are a few examples of mood or concepts boards for a variety of projects. From left to right: a studio flat, a student bar, a youth fashion store, a restaurant, a museum shop.


Mood board for a studio flat - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Mood board for a student bar - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Mood board for a youth fashion store - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Mood board for a restaurant - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Mood board for a museum shop - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image

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Sample boards

Sample boards on the other hand are specific to 3D projects and are put together to create the general feeling of the overall project image and show the proposed materials, furnishing, finishes, preferably in proportion to each other. For example, if a large quantity of a paint is used in a scheme, it should be represented by a large sample, not a small one. By keeping the samples in proportion to their intended applications, relationships are maintained.

Below are a few examples of sample boards for a variety of projects. From left to right: a living room, the adjacent dining room, a health and beauty store.

Sample board for a living room - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Sample board for the adjacent dining room - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Sample board for a health and beauty store - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image

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Layout

Although layouts of mood and sample boards vary greatly depending on the type and size of a project, basic guidelines can be followed to create boards which are visually pleasing and less cluttered.

The first step if to divide the board into thirds, both vertically and horizontally, either portrait or landscape. Place the focal point, the most important image or sample, where two of these lines cross. For example, A, B, C or D. Then, using a range of shapes, textures and heights for greater interest, carefully arrange your other images or samples around the first one.

Try to dreate lines of sight leading to the focal point and make sure all images and samples are neatly glued or mounted. The board represents the overall design and therefore should be clean.

Click on the thumbnails below for a visual representation of a basic layout


Basic layout diagram portrait - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Basic layout example portrait- Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Basic layout diagram landscape - Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image
Basic layout example landscape- Click on the thumbnail to open a larger image

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Skills  Communication

> Mood and Sample boards > Sketching > Isometric and Axonometric Projections > Perspective Drawing > Model Making > Figure Drawing > Colour Rendering


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